ComScore Video Metrix: Google Rules!

  • ComScore Video Metrix: Google Rules!

    ComScore Video Metrix: Google Rules!

    Internet analytics company comScore has just released the latest data from its Video Metrix service, a comprehensive viewing intelligence platform that provides transparent and end-to-end video measurement in the online video marketplace. The data that was released last month showed that more than 184 million U.S. Internet users have watched 36.9 billion online videos in July, with over 9.6 billion views on video ads.

    Google Sites, driven primarily by video viewing at YouTube.com, ranked as the top online video content property in January with 152 million unique viewers, followed by VEVO with 51.5 million, Yahoo! Sites with 49.2 million, Viacom Digital with 48.1 million and Facebook.com with 45.1 million. Nearly 40 billion videos views occurred during the month, with Google Sites generating the highest number at 18.6 billion, followed by Hulu with 877 million and VEVO with 717 million. The average viewer watched 22.6 hours of online video content, with Google Sites (7.5 hours) and Hulu (3.2 hours) demonstrating the highest average engagement among the top ten properties.

    Top U.S. Online Video Content Properties Ranked by Unique Video Viewers
    January 2012
    Total U.S. Home and Work Locations
    Content Videos Only (Ad Videos Not Included)
    Source: comScore Video Metrix
    Property Total Unique Viewers (000) Videos (000)* Minutes per Viewer
    Total Internet : Total Audience 181,115 39,995,849 1,354.7
    Google Sites 151,989 18,633,743 448.7
    VEVO 51,499 716,608 62.2
    Yahoo! Sites 49,215 538,260 57.4
    Viacom Digital 48,104 507,046 58.0
    Facebook.com 45,135 248,941 22.0
    Microsoft Sites 41,491 558,017 51.3
    AOL, Inc. 40,991 419,783 51.4
    Hulu 31,383 877,388 189.0
    Amazon Sites 27,906 86,705 19.7
    NBC Universal 27,096 95,034 17.2

    *A video is defined as any streamed segment of audiovisual content, including both progressive downloads and live streams. For long-form, segmented content, (e.g. television episodes with ad pods in the middle) each segment of the content is counted as a distinct video stream.